Elizabeth Reich’s “Hot Talent” in Arlington

It’s so strange sometimes when events converge around one person or place, and all of a sudden you’re seeing them everywhere. Designer Elizabeth Reich of Jenkins Baer Associates in Baltimore is that person at the moment, and at first I didn’t even know it. I blogged a couple weeks ago about Darrell Dean and his DarrellSees blog, unwittingly using images from an Arlington home Elizabeth designed:

Elizabeth then reached out to me with professional photographs of that house, shot by photographer Jamie Sentz (and omg I just discovered Jamie’s blog — gorgeous!!! Check it out, right here).

Here’s Jamie’s magazine-ready version of this Elizabeth’s design, with a knockout rug from Greenspring Carpets:

(Coffee table by Bobo; cream chair by Thomas O’Brien for Hickory Chair; wing chair and ottoman by Lee Industries; paint color is Benjamin Moore Abingdon Putty)

Here’s a wider view. I especially love how the coffered ceiling interacts with the pattern of the rug. I don’t think I would leave this room EVER.

At the same time, the latest issue of Home & Design magazine is out, where Elizabeth is featured as a new “hot talent” in the interior design community. Her Arlington project is a good illustration of that talent.

Jason and Mariel Tillett, whose son Asher is now 6, brought Elizabeth in early when they decided to build a new house. “I began working with Mariel when their house was in the framing stages and helped her make changes to the structure that made the furniture plan and layout work better for them,” Elizabeth wrote in an e-mail.

(Table and host chair by Hickory Chair; side chairs are clients’ own antiques; chandelier by Liza Sherman Antiques; drapery fabric by Schumacher; paint color is Benjamin Moore Jamestown Blue)

Beyond that fabulous family room, Elizabeth gave the Tilletts a variety of settings in which to relax, all with their own distinct personality, such as this study:

(Houndstooth chairs by Lee Industries in Eric Cohler fabric; Chesterfield sofa by Four Hands; Drapery fabric by Peter Fasano; Wall color: Benjamin Moore Glouchester Sage on walls, White Dove on trim and ceiling)

The family reports that the study is everyone’s favorite place to hang out, with that deep comfy Chesterfield sofa and those arm chairs that you can just sink right into. And who wouldn’t want to curl up in these delightful window seats?

 

Even as far as formal rooms go, the living room is also quite inviting with its soft, easy colors. The sisal rug too, since it’s not too precious, sends a great message to anyone that it’s okay to come in.

(18th century French settee and 1970’s Karl Springer coffee table from Darrell Dean Antiques; blue velvet slipper chairs, Lee Industries; end tables: J. Alexander; lamps, Visual Comfort; drapery fabric: Le Gracieux; small bronze side table, Global Views; wall color, Benjamin Moore Silver Sage on walls, White Dove on trim and ceiling)

I love the detail here in this closeup shot — Elizabeth is so good at combining lines, texture, pattern — and art! — into a cohesive whole:

And last but not least, who can forget the outside? This sun room is just the thing, with a soothing backdrop of pale lavender against a vivid blue and white print:

(wall color: Benjamin Moore Lavender Ice)

As you can see, each room is very different, but the talent of an interior designer is pulling all of that together; there is a consistent theme of soft blues, grays and greens throughout the house — and even though the drapery fabrics are all different, they are variations on the same  damask theme. Those are some subtle but important ways in which a house feels settled, and not at war with itself.

I look forward to seeing more of Elizabeth’s work in the future.

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Comments

  1. Elizabeth is an amazing designer that truly transforms homes by her creativity and design talent! Her desire is to create a home that reflect her clients. I love being able to work with Elizabeth!

  2. Sorry, but I just don’t get it. No color, furniture that reminds me of things my parents and friends had in the fifties and sixties; I guess I’m too old to appreciate. I can’t wait to see what someone says about this design 15 years from now!
    Cluny

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