Bath Design Trends in Washingtonian

I was psyched to see my articles on bath design and small-bath decorating appear in this month’s Washingtonian, with this stunning cover page showing a project by Bruce Wentworth:

cover

 

The story isn’t online yet, but I hope you get a chance to flip through it if you have a hard copy. In the meantime, I’m going to share all the gorgeous images that didn’t make it into the final printed piece!

The first trend I talk about is the notion that walls are coming down, literally, between bedroom and bath. Many homeowners who are doing this say they were inspired by a hotel stay, such as this amazing room at the W Hotel in Montreal:

WHotel_Montreal_Bath3

 

This bathroom in a Foggy Bottom row house by Kube Architecture belongs to a progressive couple who don’t mind the lack of privacy—even with glass inserts in the floors that allow a visitor to look straight… up:

Photograph by Greg Powers

Photograph by Greg Powers

 

Another trend is that homeowners are opting to get rid of the bathtub in favor of bigger showers—Anthony Wilder tells me that he does this all the time, convincing his clients that tubs aren’t worth the space they take up. Here are two great examples where Wilder successfully banished them:

Photograph by Morgan Howarth

Photograph by Morgan Howarth

 

Photograph by Morgan Howarth

Photograph by Morgan Howarth

 

In cases where homeowners must have their tubs, they are choosing to make them the central focus of the room, such as Chantilly designer Marisa Moore, who highlighted the tub in her own bathroom renovation:

Photograph by Jennifer Arnett

Photograph by Jennifer Arnett

 

Here’s another beauty, designed by Jennifer Gilmer Kitchen & Bath.

Photograph by Bob Narod

Photograph by Bob Narod

 

And here’s a bath where shower and tub share equal billing, thanks to Dee David‘s clever wrapping of tile across both spaces (and the large-format tile illustrates yet another trend in bath design!):

Photograph courtesy of Dee David

Photograph courtesy of Dee David

 

I also did a story in this issue about decorating small bathrooms where wide swaths of space were not in the cards. I surveyed several designers who talked about how they worked their way through such challenges.

Tricia Huntley had a couple tricks up her sleeve. In one impossibly tiny space, she dressed it all in dark tile, so the eye wouldn’t stop any any barriers. A framless glass shower enclosure further eases visual flow. And the dark tones signify depth, “like looking into a dark lake,” she says.

Photograph by Kevin Allen

Photograph by Kevin Allen

Tricia also had the vanity custom made with a curved front, so it wouldn’t take up so much floor space. And she put a bowl sink on top, to make room for necessities on the counter.

In another bath, Tricia used tile to differentiate the toilet and bath spaces, where in bigger bathrooms a wall would normally offer some separation between the two. She also wanted to visually highlight the vanity area, as this bath is also used as a powder room when guests are over:

Photograph by Kevin Allen

Photograph by Kevin Allen

 

Designer Camille Saum had the same issue in her small DC condo — her master bath is also the powder room, as the condo only has space for one bathroom. To visually enlarge the room, she wrapped everything in marble:

Photograph by Lydia Cutter

Photograph by Lydia Cutter

And in a clever act of double duty, the ledge holds silver bud vases and other curiosities when guests are there, and Camille’s bath necessities when they are not.

Washingtonian offers further inspiration with an exhaustive list of top bath remodelers in the area, so if you are in the market for a change, this issue is the one to keep!

 

 

 

 

 

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Comments

  1. Gary Inman says:

    Great blog Jennifer!